Class Notes
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Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
1927
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
1931
We were pleasantly surprised to receive a phone call from one of our Alfred contemporaries recently .. from Gerald J. "Jerry" Jaquiss '31 who currently resides in Boynton Beach, Florida. Although Jerry was in the class of 1931, he was very popular among members of our class in the Delta Sigma fraternity. Jerry says he's fine ... and enjoying swimming and playing golf. Jerry and his daughter attended the Alfred Reunion this past Spring ... where he enjoyed meeting Dante Vezzoli '33 again. We now hope that we'll hear from our classmates soon with more good news for the next issue. Perhaps we can send some stories and memories of the 1930's for all of us to enjoy "The Way We Were"!
1932
Editor's note - Col. Larry March sent this note to Class Notes Coordinator Gail Murphy: We came home from hospital yesterday after good reports from several doctors on Eddie's continuing, but agonizingly slow, recovery to find your note. We are truly grateful for her progress. Enjoyed your message and I took a few minutes to drop an e-mail to Frank Cornish '45, with whom Eddie and I sat for dinner at 50th Anniversary of our Class during Reunion Week 1995. Some '45 stuff: Jane (Parvin) Pack and her handsome husband, Ben, spent July 19, with Eddie and me. They were our guests for lunch at the Tampa Yacht and Country Club. This was Eddie's first venture outside the house socially since return from her extended hospitalization. Afterward, we returned home and Jane gave me the benefit of her computer knowledge as we "played" with my PC Great Day! J. Norman Jones, my high school classmate and Yale '45 grad who is a loyal participant at the annual Alfred Florida West Coast alumni rallies at Bird Key Yacht Club, Sarasota, FL, has stopped overnight several times since Eddie's disability. He does this to bolster our morale and help out. Norm lives in Punta Gorda, FL. My 1942 AU cross-country teammate, Walter Fox, continues contact via e-mail. He and wife, Norma (Stout), both of whose parents graduated from Alfred about 1925, soon shall be off for a long journey through Scotland. Walter's forestry consulting business has prospered. Wilma (McLean) Tucciarone '32 will celebrate her 90th birthday on September 23. We offer congratulations and best wishes to Wilma and Tom on this auspicious milestone! The demands here and my impaired vision intrude on my ability to become involved in too many activities. But, rest assured, my blood still runs Purple and Gold! Eddie joins me in our very best to you, Gail, and, it was good of you to write. Larry and Eddie... Mustangs Forever!
1933
Elnora Maxine Armstrong Bucher, was represented by her husband Rev. Glenn E. Bucher '38 at Reunion. She is a patient ( 2 1/2 years now) in St. James Mercy Health of Hornell, NY. Two persons in all, were present from the class of 1933 at Reunion, Dante Vezzoli and Rev. Bucher. The following notes were received. From Agnes Rutherford Starcher, "I regret that I did not attend my 65th Reunion but I do want to send greetings to those stoic individuals who made it. In spite of limitations I still think old age is wonderful! Last November I sold my house in West Virginia and came to Trail Haven Retirement Village - to be near my daughter and son-in-law who (as you've probably guessed) are golfers. It was realistic to make the move but I'm so fortunate that Pinehurst is a beautiful village and people are friendly. I'm fast becoming a Tar Heel! My best to you all and your families." Adee Nordenstedt Bennett, wrote, "How are you? No doubt, as busy as the rest of us." Philip Morgan Bennett '36 died Jan. 28, 1998 after a 12 year illness. We had a very happy, active and adventurous life for 61 years. I am still busy, doing volunteer work two days a week. I taught Latin and French for 21 years. I have two sons and one granddaughter. I still remember you (Maxine) as the very pretty, bubbling, sweet girl on campus. Still happy? With love, Adee"
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Elnora Maxine Armstrong Bucher, was represented by her husband Rev. Glenn E. Bucher '38 at Reunion. She is a patient ( 2 1/2 years now) in St. James Mercy Health of Hornell, NY. Two persons in all, were present from the class of 1933 at Reunion, Dante Vezzoli and Rev. Bucher. The following notes were received. From Agnes Rutherford Starcher, "I regret that I did not attend my 65th Reunion but I do want to send greetings to those stoic individuals who made it. In spite of limitations I still think old age is wonderful! Last November I sold my house in West Virginia and came to Trail Haven Retirement Village - to be near my daughter and son-in-law who (as you've probably guessed) are golfers. It was realistic to make the move but I'm so fortunate that Pinehurst is a beautiful village and people are friendly. I'm fast becoming a Tar Heel! My best to you all and your families." Adee Nordenstedt Bennett, wrote, "How are you? No doubt, as busy as the rest of us." Philip Morgan Bennett '36 died Jan. 28, 1998 after a 12 year illness. We had a very happy, active and adventurous life for 61 years. I am still busy, doing volunteer work two days a week. I taught Latin and French for 21 years. I have two sons and one granddaughter. I still remember you (Maxine) as the very pretty, bubbling, sweet girl on campus. Still happy? With love, Adee"
Elnora Maxine Armstrong Bucher, was represented by her husband Rev. Glenn E. Bucher '38 at Reunion. She is a patient ( 2 1/2 years now) in St. James Mercy Health of Hornell, NY. Two persons in all, were present from the class of 1933 at Reunion, Dante Vezzoli and Rev. Bucher. The following notes were received. From Agnes Rutherford Starcher, "I regret that I did not attend my 65th Reunion but I do want to send greetings to those stoic individuals who made it. In spite of limitations I still think old age is wonderful! Last November I sold my house in West Virginia and came to Trail Haven Retirement Village - to be near my daughter and son-in-law who (as you've probably guessed) are golfers. It was realistic to make the move but I'm so fortunate that Pinehurst is a beautiful village and people are friendly. I'm fast becoming a Tar Heel! My best to you all and your families." Adee Nordenstedt Bennett, wrote, "How are you? No doubt, as busy as the rest of us." Philip Morgan Bennett '36 died Jan. 28, 1998 after a 12 year illness. We had a very happy, active and adventurous life for 61 years. I am still busy, doing volunteer work two days a week. I taught Latin and French for 21 years. I have two sons and one granddaughter. I still remember you (Maxine) as the very pretty, bubbling, sweet girl on campus. Still happy? With love, Adee"
Elnora Maxine Armstrong Bucher, was represented by her husband Rev. Glenn E. Bucher '38 at Reunion. She is a patient ( 2 1/2 years now) in St. James Mercy Health of Hornell, NY. Two persons in all, were present from the class of 1933 at Reunion, Dante Vezzoli and Rev. Bucher. The following notes were received. From Agnes Rutherford Starcher, "I regret that I did not attend my 65th Reunion but I do want to send greetings to those stoic individuals who made it. In spite of limitations I still think old age is wonderful! Last November I sold my house in West Virginia and came to Trail Haven Retirement Village - to be near my daughter and son-in-law who (as you've probably guessed) are golfers. It was realistic to make the move but I'm so fortunate that Pinehurst is a beautiful village and people are friendly. I'm fast becoming a Tar Heel! My best to you all and your families." Adee Nordenstedt Bennett, wrote, "How are you? No doubt, as busy as the rest of us." Philip Morgan Bennett '36 died Jan. 28, 1998 after a 12 year illness. We had a very happy, active and adventurous life for 61 years. I am still busy, doing volunteer work two days a week. I taught Latin and French for 21 years. I have two sons and one granddaughter. I still remember you (Maxine) as the very pretty, bubbling, sweet girl on campus. Still happy? With love, Adee"
1935
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Classmates and friends: where does the time go? My recent 10-day visit at my son Joe's in Douglasville, GA certainly went too fast. Weather was fine except for one bad thunderstorm in the middle of the night and we were thankful the house was not hurt in any way. My oldest grandson, Mark Joseph Cantwell was awarded his Ph.D. in Biomedical Science. His dissertation was on the Tumor Necrosis Factor: Family Roles in Disease Pathology and Therapy. There were six colleges and six departments of study making a total of 534 graduates taking part and receiving degrees. Yes, I counted every name in the booklet we were given. Since Mark's grandpa is deceased, Grandma (me) must go to these great occasions. Next on the calendar will be Michael's graduation from the University of Georgia. The boys are brothers and good students. I am very lucky. Be sure you go to the graduations of the students in your family. A letter from Dr. Robert F. Foote said he was recently honored by the Medical Society at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in San Francisco. A nice dinner was served and a Gold Lapel Pin was awarded Bob for he had practiced 50 years. This was a real surprise for Bob. He has retired and now lives in Palm Desert, CA. Bob wrote in a previous letter that he sees Barney Oldfield '36 frequently. He keeps busy and healthy by swimming every day, attending two surgical meetings a week and takes non-medical courses at the College of the Desert. Bob sends best regards to all his former classmates and other folks he knew at A.U. I hope everyone enjoyed a nice summer and good weather. Do send me some news.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
1936
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Elnora Maxine Armstrong Bucher, was represented by her husband Rev. Glenn E. Bucher '38 at Reunion. She is a patient ( 2 1/2 years now) in St. James Mercy Health of Hornell, NY. Two persons in all, were present from the class of 1933 at Reunion, Dante Vezzoli and Rev. Bucher. The following notes were received. From Agnes Rutherford Starcher, "I regret that I did not attend my 65th Reunion but I do want to send greetings to those stoic individuals who made it. In spite of limitations I still think old age is wonderful! Last November I sold my house in West Virginia and came to Trail Haven Retirement Village - to be near my daughter and son-in-law who (as you've probably guessed) are golfers. It was realistic to make the move but I'm so fortunate that Pinehurst is a beautiful village and people are friendly. I'm fast becoming a Tar Heel! My best to you all and your families." Adee Nordenstedt Bennett, wrote, "How are you? No doubt, as busy as the rest of us." Philip Morgan Bennett '36 died Jan. 28, 1998 after a 12 year illness. We had a very happy, active and adventurous life for 61 years. I am still busy, doing volunteer work two days a week. I taught Latin and French for 21 years. I have two sons and one granddaughter. I still remember you (Maxine) as the very pretty, bubbling, sweet girl on campus. Still happy? With love, Adee"
Classmates and friends: where does the time go? My recent 10-day visit at my son Joe's in Douglasville, GA certainly went too fast. Weather was fine except for one bad thunderstorm in the middle of the night and we were thankful the house was not hurt in any way. My oldest grandson, Mark Joseph Cantwell was awarded his Ph.D. in Biomedical Science. His dissertation was on the Tumor Necrosis Factor: Family Roles in Disease Pathology and Therapy. There were six colleges and six departments of study making a total of 534 graduates taking part and receiving degrees. Yes, I counted every name in the booklet we were given. Since Mark's grandpa is deceased, Grandma (me) must go to these great occasions. Next on the calendar will be Michael's graduation from the University of Georgia. The boys are brothers and good students. I am very lucky. Be sure you go to the graduations of the students in your family. A letter from Dr. Robert F. Foote said he was recently honored by the Medical Society at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in San Francisco. A nice dinner was served and a Gold Lapel Pin was awarded Bob for he had practiced 50 years. This was a real surprise for Bob. He has retired and now lives in Palm Desert, CA. Bob wrote in a previous letter that he sees Barney Oldfield '36 frequently. He keeps busy and healthy by swimming every day, attending two surgical meetings a week and takes non-medical courses at the College of the Desert. Bob sends best regards to all his former classmates and other folks he knew at A.U. I hope everyone enjoyed a nice summer and good weather. Do send me some news.
1937
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Alfred, Fall, 1942 - that's right, 1942 - what are your memories? Mine start with literally tripping off the train in Hornell, missing the bus to Alfred, frantically finding a taxi and arriving at the Brick in emotional disarray. Do I remember a "black out" during an orientation get-together in Social Hall when Abe Akaka kept on strumming and singing? (The Rev. Abe later married Mary Lou Jeffrey '44.) I do remember then Dean M. Ellis Drake telling jokes about the "weary Erie" and Dean Dora Degen explaining our sign-in hours. And Frosh Court for errant Freshman men! For disrespect to an upper classman Hank Cottrell '44 was sentenced to a week of wearing a bird cage over his head when he went to classes, allowed to speak only if he opened the cage door. We all wore green beanies - for how long? We bought necessities at Miss Coates' store and Jaycox Grocery, ate ice cream (real cream) at the Ag-Tech, bought gifts at the Terra Cotta, rode the bus to Hornell to purchase "big city stuff." We went to the movies Thursday, Friday or Saturday nights, climbing the well-worn stairs in Alumni Hall to sit on the creaky wooden seats. Lillian Nevins '37 sold us our tickets; W. Varick ran the projector. How much were those tickets? No football games for us. The field had been washed out by spring flooding and anyway men were fast disappearing into the military. By April our class was predominantly female; by fall of sophomore year, men were almost non-existent. But, then came the Army Specialized Training Program, the (A.S.T.P.) I'll stop here - and wait for you to send me some of your memories of our Alfred.
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Connie Brown Getz did not attend Reunion but wrote a note which follows. "Some of us have had a bumpy voyage. Perhaps the artistic people have had a very bumpy passage. Eighty years old means get braced, there is lots to come at this time. Courage and patience are the words appropriate. My ceramic art and Pi Alpha Pi friends are gone. Belle Deet Baschnagel passed away suddenly many years ago. Ruth Gosch Harding has just passed away, shortly after her husband Bob. I wasn't prepared for this. Ruth had written somewhat as if she were recovering. I should have realized otherwise when she called me the survivor. I had sent letters and pictures of reunions to her for which she thanked me. And so her final letter closed and I received a note about her death. Hopefully you saw many friends at this time. This makes life worthwhile." Peg Reilley King also wrote, "Dear Classmates, My good intentions for attending our 60th have failed. I regret that I shall not see all of you. My husband and I live in a 'Life Care Retirement' on the outskirts of Charlotte, NC. He is a patient in our medical facility at the present time and leaving him is impossible. He also was intending to return to Cornell University for his 60th. Life doesn't always cater to our wishes. Hope you had a wonderful reunion and enjoyed seeing each other. My thoughts were surely with all of you." P.S. Our daughter attended her 35th at Alfred at the same time as my 60th. Melda Creagh wrote, "On several of my 20 some visits to enjoy Ireland's archeology and scenery, I have had a scrumptious tea at Dorothy Schirm Ievers' '39 home in County Claire. Dorothy Elve Tombaugh and Mary Hoyt Perry, both class of '38, are my faithful correspondents.
1938
Connie Brown Getz did not attend Reunion but wrote a note which follows. "Some of us have had a bumpy voyage. Perhaps the artistic people have had a very bumpy passage. Eighty years old means get braced, there is lots to come at this time. Courage and patience are the words appropriate. My ceramic art and Pi Alpha Pi friends are gone. Belle Deet Baschnagel passed away suddenly many years ago. Ruth Gosch Harding has just passed away, shortly after her husband Bob. I wasn't prepared for this. Ruth had written somewhat as if she were recovering. I should have realized otherwise when she called me the survivor. I had sent letters and pictures of reunions to her for which she thanked me. And so her final letter closed and I received a note about her death. Hopefully you saw many friends at this time. This makes life worthwhile." Peg Reilley King also wrote, "Dear Classmates, My good intentions for attending our 60th have failed. I regret that I shall not see all of you. My husband and I live in a 'Life Care Retirement' on the outskirts of Charlotte, NC. He is a patient in our medical facility at the present time and leaving him is impossible. He also was intending to return to Cornell University for his 60th. Life doesn't always cater to our wishes. Hope you had a wonderful reunion and enjoyed seeing each other. My thoughts were surely with all of you." P.S. Our daughter attended her 35th at Alfred at the same time as my 60th. Melda Creagh wrote, "On several of my 20 some visits to enjoy Ireland's archeology and scenery, I have had a scrumptious tea at Dorothy Schirm Ievers' '39 home in County Claire. Dorothy Elve Tombaugh and Mary Hoyt Perry, both class of '38, are my faithful correspondents.
Connie Brown Getz did not attend Reunion but wrote a note which follows. "Some of us have had a bumpy voyage. Perhaps the artistic people have had a very bumpy passage. Eighty years old means get braced, there is lots to come at this time. Courage and patience are the words appropriate. My ceramic art and Pi Alpha Pi friends are gone. Belle Deet Baschnagel passed away suddenly many years ago. Ruth Gosch Harding has just passed away, shortly after her husband Bob. I wasn't prepared for this. Ruth had written somewhat as if she were recovering. I should have realized otherwise when she called me the survivor. I had sent letters and pictures of reunions to her for which she thanked me. And so her final letter closed and I received a note about her death. Hopefully you saw many friends at this time. This makes life worthwhile." Peg Reilley King also wrote, "Dear Classmates, My good intentions for attending our 60th have failed. I regret that I shall not see all of you. My husband and I live in a 'Life Care Retirement' on the outskirts of Charlotte, NC. He is a patient in our medical facility at the present time and leaving him is impossible. He also was intending to return to Cornell University for his 60th. Life doesn't always cater to our wishes. Hope you had a wonderful reunion and enjoyed seeing each other. My thoughts were surely with all of you." P.S. Our daughter attended her 35th at Alfred at the same time as my 60th. Melda Creagh wrote, "On several of my 20 some visits to enjoy Ireland's archeology and scenery, I have had a scrumptious tea at Dorothy Schirm Ievers' '39 home in County Claire. Dorothy Elve Tombaugh and Mary Hoyt Perry, both class of '38, are my faithful correspondents.
Connie Brown Getz did not attend Reunion but wrote a note which follows. "Some of us have had a bumpy voyage. Perhaps the artistic people have had a very bumpy passage. Eighty years old means get braced, there is lots to come at this time. Courage and patience are the words appropriate. My ceramic art and Pi Alpha Pi friends are gone. Belle Deet Baschnagel passed away suddenly many years ago. Ruth Gosch Harding has just passed away, shortly after her husband Bob. I wasn't prepared for this. Ruth had written somewhat as if she were recovering. I should have realized otherwise when she called me the survivor. I had sent letters and pictures of reunions to her for which she thanked me. And so her final letter closed and I received a note about her death. Hopefully you saw many friends at this time. This makes life worthwhile." Peg Reilley King also wrote, "Dear Classmates, My good intentions for attending our 60th have failed. I regret that I shall not see all of you. My husband and I live in a 'Life Care Retirement' on the outskirts of Charlotte, NC. He is a patient in our medical facility at the present time and leaving him is impossible. He also was intending to return to Cornell University for his 60th. Life doesn't always cater to our wishes. Hope you had a wonderful reunion and enjoyed seeing each other. My thoughts were surely with all of you." P.S. Our daughter attended her 35th at Alfred at the same time as my 60th. Melda Creagh wrote, "On several of my 20 some visits to enjoy Ireland's archeology and scenery, I have had a scrumptious tea at Dorothy Schirm Ievers' '39 home in County Claire. Dorothy Elve Tombaugh and Mary Hoyt Perry, both class of '38, are my faithful correspondents.
Connie Brown Getz did not attend Reunion but wrote a note which follows. "Some of us have had a bumpy voyage. Perhaps the artistic people have had a very bumpy passage. Eighty years old means get braced, there is lots to come at this time. Courage and patience are the words appropriate. My ceramic art and Pi Alpha Pi friends are gone. Belle Deet Baschnagel passed away suddenly many years ago. Ruth Gosch Harding has just passed away, shortly after her husband Bob. I wasn't prepared for this. Ruth had written somewhat as if she were recovering. I should have realized otherwise when she called me the survivor. I had sent letters and pictures of reunions to her for which she thanked me. And so her final letter closed and I received a note about her death. Hopefully you saw many friends at this time. This makes life worthwhile." Peg Reilley King also wrote, "Dear Classmates, My good intentions for attending our 60th have failed. I regret that I shall not see all of you. My husband and I live in a 'Life Care Retirement' on the outskirts of Charlotte, NC. He is a patient in our medical facility at the present time and leaving him is impossible. He also was intending to return to Cornell University for his 60th. Life doesn't always cater to our wishes. Hope you had a wonderful reunion and enjoyed seeing each other. My thoughts were surely with all of you." P.S. Our daughter attended her 35th at Alfred at the same time as my 60th. Melda Creagh wrote, "On several of my 20 some visits to enjoy Ireland's archeology and scenery, I have had a scrumptious tea at Dorothy Schirm Ievers' '39 home in County Claire. Dorothy Elve Tombaugh and Mary Hoyt Perry, both class of '38, are my faithful correspondents.
Connie Brown Getz did not attend Reunion but wrote a note which follows. "Some of us have had a bumpy voyage. Perhaps the artistic people have had a very bumpy passage. Eighty years old means get braced, there is lots to come at this time. Courage and patience are the words appropriate. My ceramic art and Pi Alpha Pi friends are gone. Belle Deet Baschnagel passed away suddenly many years ago. Ruth Gosch Harding has just passed away, shortly after her husband Bob. I wasn't prepared for this. Ruth had written somewhat as if she were recovering. I should have realized otherwise when she called me the survivor. I had sent letters and pictures of reunions to her for which she thanked me. And so her final letter closed and I received a note about her death. Hopefully you saw many friends at this time. This makes life worthwhile." Peg Reilley King also wrote, "Dear Classmates, My good intentions for attending our 60th have failed. I regret that I shall not see all of you. My husband and I live in a 'Life Care Retirement' on the outskirts of Charlotte, NC. He is a patient in our medical facility at the present time and leaving him is impossible. He also was intending to return to Cornell University for his 60th. Life doesn't always cater to our wishes. Hope you had a wonderful reunion and enjoyed seeing each other. My thoughts were surely with all of you." P.S. Our daughter attended her 35th at Alfred at the same time as my 60th. Melda Creagh wrote, "On several of my 20 some visits to enjoy Ireland's archeology and scenery, I have had a scrumptious tea at Dorothy Schirm Ievers' '39 home in County Claire. Dorothy Elve Tombaugh and Mary Hoyt Perry, both class of '38, are my faithful correspondents.
Connie Brown Getz did not attend Reunion but wrote a note which follows. "Some of us have had a bumpy voyage. Perhaps the artistic people have had a very bumpy passage. Eighty years old means get braced, there is lots to come at this time. Courage and patience are the words appropriate. My ceramic art and Pi Alpha Pi friends are gone. Belle Deet Baschnagel passed away suddenly many years ago. Ruth Gosch Harding has just passed away, shortly after her husband Bob. I wasn't prepared for this. Ruth had written somewhat as if she were recovering. I should have realized otherwise when she called me the survivor. I had sent letters and pictures of reunions to her for which she thanked me. And so her final letter closed and I received a note about her death. Hopefully you saw many friends at this time. This makes life worthwhile." Peg Reilley King also wrote, "Dear Classmates, My good intentions for attending our 60th have failed. I regret that I shall not see all of you. My husband and I live in a 'Life Care Retirement' on the outskirts of Charlotte, NC. He is a patient in our medical facility at the present time and leaving him is impossible. He also was intending to return to Cornell University for his 60th. Life doesn't always cater to our wishes. Hope you had a wonderful reunion and enjoyed seeing each other. My thoughts were surely with all of you." P.S. Our daughter attended her 35th at Alfred at the same time as my 60th. Melda Creagh wrote, "On several of my 20 some visits to enjoy Ireland's archeology and scenery, I have had a scrumptious tea at Dorothy Schirm Ievers' '39 home in County Claire. Dorothy Elve Tombaugh and Mary Hoyt Perry, both class of '38, are my faithful correspondents.
Connie Brown Getz did not attend Reunion but wrote a note which follows. "Some of us have had a bumpy voyage. Perhaps the artistic people have had a very bumpy passage. Eighty years old means get braced, there is lots to come at this time. Courage and patience are the words appropriate. My ceramic art and Pi Alpha Pi friends are gone. Belle Deet Baschnagel passed away suddenly many years ago. Ruth Gosch Harding has just passed away, shortly after her husband Bob. I wasn't prepared for this. Ruth had written somewhat as if she were recovering. I should have realized otherwise when she called me the survivor. I had sent letters and pictures of reunions to her for which she thanked me. And so her final letter closed and I received a note about her death. Hopefully you saw many friends at this time. This makes life worthwhile." Peg Reilley King also wrote, "Dear Classmates, My good intentions for attending our 60th have failed. I regret that I shall not see all of you. My husband and I live in a 'Life Care Retirement' on the outskirts of Charlotte, NC. He is a patient in our medical facility at the present time and leaving him is impossible. He also was intending to return to Cornell University for his 60th. Life doesn't always cater to our wishes. Hope you had a wonderful reunion and enjoyed seeing each other. My thoughts were surely with all of you." P.S. Our daughter attended her 35th at Alfred at the same time as my 60th. Melda Creagh wrote, "On several of my 20 some visits to enjoy Ireland's archeology and scenery, I have had a scrumptious tea at Dorothy Schirm Ievers' '39 home in County Claire. Dorothy Elve Tombaugh and Mary Hoyt Perry, both class of '38, are my faithful correspondents.
Elnora Maxine Armstrong Bucher, was represented by her husband Rev. Glenn E. Bucher '38 at Reunion. She is a patient ( 2 1/2 years now) in St. James Mercy Health of Hornell, NY. Two persons in all, were present from the class of 1933 at Reunion, Dante Vezzoli and Rev. Bucher. The following notes were received. From Agnes Rutherford Starcher, "I regret that I did not attend my 65th Reunion but I do want to send greetings to those stoic individuals who made it. In spite of limitations I still think old age is wonderful! Last November I sold my house in West Virginia and came to Trail Haven Retirement Village - to be near my daughter and son-in-law who (as you've probably guessed) are golfers. It was realistic to make the move but I'm so fortunate that Pinehurst is a beautiful village and people are friendly. I'm fast becoming a Tar Heel! My best to you all and your families." Adee Nordenstedt Bennett, wrote, "How are you? No doubt, as busy as the rest of us." Philip Morgan Bennett '36 died Jan. 28, 1998 after a 12 year illness. We had a very happy, active and adventurous life for 61 years. I am still busy, doing volunteer work two days a week. I taught Latin and French for 21 years. I have two sons and one granddaughter. I still remember you (Maxine) as the very pretty, bubbling, sweet girl on campus. Still happy? With love, Adee"
1943
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
1944
Alfred, Fall, 1942 - that's right, 1942 - what are your memories? Mine start with literally tripping off the train in Hornell, missing the bus to Alfred, frantically finding a taxi and arriving at the Brick in emotional disarray. Do I remember a "black out" during an orientation get-together in Social Hall when Abe Akaka kept on strumming and singing? (The Rev. Abe later married Mary Lou Jeffrey '44.) I do remember then Dean M. Ellis Drake telling jokes about the "weary Erie" and Dean Dora Degen explaining our sign-in hours. And Frosh Court for errant Freshman men! For disrespect to an upper classman Hank Cottrell '44 was sentenced to a week of wearing a bird cage over his head when he went to classes, allowed to speak only if he opened the cage door. We all wore green beanies - for how long? We bought necessities at Miss Coates' store and Jaycox Grocery, ate ice cream (real cream) at the Ag-Tech, bought gifts at the Terra Cotta, rode the bus to Hornell to purchase "big city stuff." We went to the movies Thursday, Friday or Saturday nights, climbing the well-worn stairs in Alumni Hall to sit on the creaky wooden seats. Lillian Nevins '37 sold us our tickets; W. Varick ran the projector. How much were those tickets? No football games for us. The field had been washed out by spring flooding and anyway men were fast disappearing into the military. By April our class was predominantly female; by fall of sophomore year, men were almost non-existent. But, then came the Army Specialized Training Program, the (A.S.T.P.) I'll stop here - and wait for you to send me some of your memories of our Alfred.
1945
Editor's note - Col. Larry March sent this note to Class Notes Coordinator Gail Murphy: We came home from hospital yesterday after good reports from several doctors on Eddie's continuing, but agonizingly slow, recovery to find your note. We are truly grateful for her progress. Enjoyed your message and I took a few minutes to drop an e-mail to Frank Cornish '45, with whom Eddie and I sat for dinner at 50th Anniversary of our Class during Reunion Week 1995. Some '45 stuff: Jane (Parvin) Pack and her handsome husband, Ben, spent July 19, with Eddie and me. They were our guests for lunch at the Tampa Yacht and Country Club. This was Eddie's first venture outside the house socially since return from her extended hospitalization. Afterward, we returned home and Jane gave me the benefit of her computer knowledge as we "played" with my PC Great Day! J. Norman Jones, my high school classmate and Yale '45 grad who is a loyal participant at the annual Alfred Florida West Coast alumni rallies at Bird Key Yacht Club, Sarasota, FL, has stopped overnight several times since Eddie's disability. He does this to bolster our morale and help out. Norm lives in Punta Gorda, FL. My 1942 AU cross-country teammate, Walter Fox, continues contact via e-mail. He and wife, Norma (Stout), both of whose parents graduated from Alfred about 1925, soon shall be off for a long journey through Scotland. Walter's forestry consulting business has prospered. Wilma (McLean) Tucciarone '32 will celebrate her 90th birthday on September 23. We offer congratulations and best wishes to Wilma and Tom on this auspicious milestone! The demands here and my impaired vision intrude on my ability to become involved in too many activities. But, rest assured, my blood still runs Purple and Gold! Eddie joins me in our very best to you, Gail, and, it was good of you to write. Larry and Eddie... Mustangs Forever!
Editor's note - Col. Larry March sent this note to Class Notes Coordinator Gail Murphy: We came home from hospital yesterday after good reports from several doctors on Eddie's continuing, but agonizingly slow, recovery to find your note. We are truly grateful for her progress. Enjoyed your message and I took a few minutes to drop an e-mail to Frank Cornish '45, with whom Eddie and I sat for dinner at 50th Anniversary of our Class during Reunion Week 1995. Some '45 stuff: Jane (Parvin) Pack and her handsome husband, Ben, spent July 19, with Eddie and me. They were our guests for lunch at the Tampa Yacht and Country Club. This was Eddie's first venture outside the house socially since return from her extended hospitalization. Afterward, we returned home and Jane gave me the benefit of her computer knowledge as we "played" with my PC Great Day! J. Norman Jones, my high school classmate and Yale '45 grad who is a loyal participant at the annual Alfred Florida West Coast alumni rallies at Bird Key Yacht Club, Sarasota, FL, has stopped overnight several times since Eddie's disability. He does this to bolster our morale and help out. Norm lives in Punta Gorda, FL. My 1942 AU cross-country teammate, Walter Fox, continues contact via e-mail. He and wife, Norma (Stout), both of whose parents graduated from Alfred about 1925, soon shall be off for a long journey through Scotland. Walter's forestry consulting business has prospered. Wilma (McLean) Tucciarone '32 will celebrate her 90th birthday on September 23. We offer congratulations and best wishes to Wilma and Tom on this auspicious milestone! The demands here and my impaired vision intrude on my ability to become involved in too many activities. But, rest assured, my blood still runs Purple and Gold! Eddie joins me in our very best to you, Gail, and, it was good of you to write. Larry and Eddie... Mustangs Forever!
Editor's note - Col. Larry March sent this note to Class Notes Coordinator Gail Murphy: We came home from hospital yesterday after good reports from several doctors on Eddie's continuing, but agonizingly slow, recovery to find your note. We are truly grateful for her progress. Enjoyed your message and I took a few minutes to drop an e-mail to Frank Cornish '45, with whom Eddie and I sat for dinner at 50th Anniversary of our Class during Reunion Week 1995. Some '45 stuff: Jane (Parvin) Pack and her handsome husband, Ben, spent July 19, with Eddie and me. They were our guests for lunch at the Tampa Yacht and Country Club. This was Eddie's first venture outside the house socially since return from her extended hospitalization. Afterward, we returned home and Jane gave me the benefit of her computer knowledge as we "played" with my PC Great Day! J. Norman Jones, my high school classmate and Yale '45 grad who is a loyal participant at the annual Alfred Florida West Coast alumni rallies at Bird Key Yacht Club, Sarasota, FL, has stopped overnight several times since Eddie's disability. He does this to bolster our morale and help out. Norm lives in Punta Gorda, FL. My 1942 AU cross-country teammate, Walter Fox, continues contact via e-mail. He and wife, Norma (Stout), both of whose parents graduated from Alfred about 1925, soon shall be off for a long journey through Scotland. Walter's forestry consulting business has prospered. Wilma (McLean) Tucciarone '32 will celebrate her 90th birthday on September 23. We offer congratulations and best wishes to Wilma and Tom on this auspicious milestone! The demands here and my impaired vision intrude on my ability to become involved in too many activities. But, rest assured, my blood still runs Purple and Gold! Eddie joins me in our very best to you, Gail, and, it was good of you to write. Larry and Eddie... Mustangs Forever!
Editor's note - Col. Larry March sent this note to Class Notes Coordinator Gail Murphy: We came home from hospital yesterday after good reports from several doctors on Eddie's continuing, but agonizingly slow, recovery to find your note. We are truly grateful for her progress. Enjoyed your message and I took a few minutes to drop an e-mail to Frank Cornish '45, with whom Eddie and I sat for dinner at 50th Anniversary of our Class during Reunion Week 1995. Some '45 stuff: Jane (Parvin) Pack and her handsome husband, Ben, spent July 19, with Eddie and me. They were our guests for lunch at the Tampa Yacht and Country Club. This was Eddie's first venture outside the house socially since return from her extended hospitalization. Afterward, we returned home and Jane gave me the benefit of her computer knowledge as we "played" with my PC Great Day! J. Norman Jones, my high school classmate and Yale '45 grad who is a loyal participant at the annual Alfred Florida West Coast alumni rallies at Bird Key Yacht Club, Sarasota, FL, has stopped overnight several times since Eddie's disability. He does this to bolster our morale and help out. Norm lives in Punta Gorda, FL. My 1942 AU cross-country teammate, Walter Fox, continues contact via e-mail. He and wife, Norma (Stout), both of whose parents graduated from Alfred about 1925, soon shall be off for a long journey through Scotland. Walter's forestry consulting business has prospered. Wilma (McLean) Tucciarone '32 will celebrate her 90th birthday on September 23. We offer congratulations and best wishes to Wilma and Tom on this auspicious milestone! The demands here and my impaired vision intrude on my ability to become involved in too many activities. But, rest assured, my blood still runs Purple and Gold! Eddie joins me in our very best to you, Gail, and, it was good of you to write. Larry and Eddie... Mustangs Forever!
1948
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, JeAnne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
1949
It is with great regret that I am unable to find the letter I read recently concerning the thoughts of an Alumnus, class of 1883, on returning to the Alfred Campus after an absence of many years. He made note of the great changes in physical appearance and attitudes which had occurred in the interval between 1883 graduation and the 50th year Reunion celebration in 1933. Several of my classmates voiced the same sentiments on this, our 50th reunion. We too, found enormous changes. To survive is to progress. We found that the activities desired 50 years ago to unite us as a "family" no longer exist - formal balls, St. Pat's Festival, even the rigidity of the Frosh Rules and attendance at Assembly programs every Thursday. Just to let other classes know, there were 41 graduates of the Class of '48 strolling, walking, wandering, sauntering, traipsing, limping, shuffling, and hobbling about the hills of the Alfred campus the first weekend of June 1998. Present were: Millicent Albert Casey, Linda Allardt, Joan Baird Murray, Margaret Baker McCandless, Robert Burdick, Marie Cherichetti, Patricia Crofoot Turnbull, Wallace Davidow, Eugene Drozdowski, James Dwinelle, Athalene Everman Fisher, Joan Gaffney Boicourt, Page Gentsch, Edwin (Shifty) Gere, Mary Ann Goodrich Taylor, Kenneth Goss, Carl Hagberg, Phyllis Hurlburt Rigby, Norma Jacox Stoneham, Ruth Jensen Stern, Harley Lindquist, Mary Lowden, Betsy McCormack Drew, Jeanne Morgan Holman, W. Clayton Ormsby, Donald Polan, Raymond Posluszny, Alfred Powers, Roxanne Robarts Harris, Jane Rupprecht Powers, Marilyn Schneider Herrick, Raymond Scholts, Anne Seely DeFrancisco, John Seidlin, Betty Smith Costello, Constance Snyder, Pam Space Lain, Miriam Tooke Polan, Dorris Weaver Gentsch, and Robert Wilson. Anyone left out was the fault of the Alumni Office or me! My classmates convinced me that I should continue as class correspondent. I found out how much fun it was to be with my classmates again - more pleasure than I remembered over the previous years. A third book of poetry by Linda Allardt is to be published this summer. Verna Church Willis is still teaching at Georgia State University. Eugene Drozdowski brought a daughter with him to Reunion. Page Gentsch served admirably as the reunion coordinator along with Dorris, of course. Kenneth Gross, with wife Dotty (Burdick '46), brought along his dog in the back of this station wagon from Arkansas. Norma Jacox Stoneham and husband, Harry, still made their annual winter trip to Florida for a tennis vacation. Buzz Setchel was on a trip to Alaska and could not make the Reunion. Mike Nadler asked us "to tip one for him" and sends his regrets as he and his wife could not make the trip and then a second trip to the family reunion on the East Coast later in the summer. Shifty Gere did his best in the reunion coordination as "assistant" and wrote the following verses to the melody Thanks For The Memories, (with apologies to Bob Hope): Thanks for the memories - of happy Alfred days of our college which we praise Of classmates true, professors, too Our voices let us raise We have missed you - Little Alf We are the World War class From 1940 to 1948 - we thought we'd never graduate But now three cheers for fifty years We're back to celebrate And we love you - Little Alf Many classroom lectures we attended Seminars and lab sessions, too But we much preferred the Beacon and the Kant-U Oh, we did have fun - way back when time begun So here's to those good old days Of the purple and the gold And Saxon teams so bold Of St. Pat's Ball, Alumni Hall And memories untold We Thank You We Thank You-Little Alf! A small "raggedly enthusiastic" chorus entertained the audience with this song at the 50th Reunion Banquet Saturday night to close the evening's festivities.
Ned Martin retired from insurance work with Equitable Life in New York City in May '87 and is enjoying every minute of retirement. He says, " My wife, Charlotte, and I moved from New Jersey to Lewes, Delaware. We love the water. I have my own boat and can fish whenever I want. We also enjoy travel and have been abroad to England and Europe. This past April we took a wonderful trip to Portugal, Morocco and Spain." Isabelle (Ellis) McMahon and her husband, Bill, ran a restaurant and campground for 20 years, and are still running the campground in a beautiful area overlooking the Potomac River in western Maryland. She relates, "We are animal lovers and share our home with 11 dogs and 27 cats who live inside. Recently my sister, Mary Kay (Ellis) Earle '49 moved from Arizona to live with us." Fong Chow is retired now from his interesting career as Oriental ceramic expert for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He says, "I have always been an artist at heart, and I loved having a studio, but now I am continuing with painting and photography. I have held several one-man shows in nearby areas." Fong and his wife, Chao-Ling, live in New York City and vacation annually in Maine. Jean (Richmond) Wolcott reports that she and three classmates met for lunch in Syracuse on June 16th: Betty Lou (Ogden) Crowley and her husband Bick, Alice (Folts) Burdick, and Lenore (Zito) Falvo and her husband Vincent. The main topic of conversation was Betty Lou's recent trip to Germany.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
1952
Ned Martin retired from insurance work with Equitable Life in New York City in May '87 and is enjoying every minute of retirement. He says, " My wife, Charlotte, and I moved from New Jersey to Lewes, Delaware. We love the water. I have my own boat and can fish whenever I want. We also enjoy travel and have been abroad to England and Europe. This past April we took a wonderful trip to Portugal, Morocco and Spain." Isabelle (Ellis) McMahon and her husband, Bill, ran a restaurant and campground for 20 years, and are still running the campground in a beautiful area overlooking the Potomac River in western Maryland. She relates, "We are animal lovers and share our home with 11 dogs and 27 cats who live inside. Recently my sister, Mary Kay (Ellis) Earle '49 moved from Arizona to live with us." Fong Chow is retired now from his interesting career as Oriental ceramic expert for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He says, "I have always been an artist at heart, and I loved having a studio, but now I am continuing with painting and photography. I have held several one-man shows in nearby areas." Fong and his wife, Chao-Ling, live in New York City and vacation annually in Maine. Jean (Richmond) Wolcott reports that she and three classmates met for lunch in Syracuse on June 16th: Betty Lou (Ogden) Crowley and her husband Bick, Alice (Folts) Burdick, and Lenore (Zito) Falvo and her husband Vincent. The main topic of conversation was Betty Lou's recent trip to Germany.
Ned Martin retired from insurance work with Equitable Life in New York City in May '87 and is enjoying every minute of retirement. He says, " My wife, Charlotte, and I moved from New Jersey to Lewes, Delaware. We love the water. I have my own boat and can fish whenever I want. We also enjoy travel and have been abroad to England and Europe. This past April we took a wonderful trip to Portugal, Morocco and Spain." Isabelle (Ellis) McMahon and her husband, Bill, ran a restaurant and campground for 20 years, and are still running the campground in a beautiful area overlooking the Potomac River in western Maryland. She relates, "We are animal lovers and share our home with 11 dogs and 27 cats who live inside. Recently my sister, Mary Kay (Ellis) Earle '49 moved from Arizona to live with us." Fong Chow is retired now from his interesting career as Oriental ceramic expert for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He says, "I have always been an artist at heart, and I loved having a studio, but now I am continuing with painting and photography. I have held several one-man shows in nearby areas." Fong and his wife, Chao-Ling, live in New York City and vacation annually in Maine. Jean (Richmond) Wolcott reports that she and three classmates met for lunch in Syracuse on June 16th: Betty Lou (Ogden) Crowley and her husband Bick, Alice (Folts) Burdick, and Lenore (Zito) Falvo and her husband Vincent. The main topic of conversation was Betty Lou's recent trip to Germany.
Ned Martin retired from insurance work with Equitable Life in New York City in May '87 and is enjoying every minute of retirement. He says, " My wife, Charlotte, and I moved from New Jersey to Lewes, Delaware. We love the water. I have my own boat and can fish whenever I want. We also enjoy travel and have been abroad to England and Europe. This past April we took a wonderful trip to Portugal, Morocco and Spain." Isabelle (Ellis) McMahon and her husband, Bill, ran a restaurant and campground for 20 years, and are still running the campground in a beautiful area overlooking the Potomac River in western Maryland. She relates, "We are animal lovers and share our home with 11 dogs and 27 cats who live inside. Recently my sister, Mary Kay (Ellis) Earle '49 moved from Arizona to live with us." Fong Chow is retired now from his interesting career as Oriental ceramic expert for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He says, "I have always been an artist at heart, and I loved having a studio, but now I am continuing with painting and photography. I have held several one-man shows in nearby areas." Fong and his wife, Chao-Ling, live in New York City and vacation annually in Maine. Jean (Richmond) Wolcott reports that she and three classmates met for lunch in Syracuse on June 16th: Betty Lou (Ogden) Crowley and her husband Bick, Alice (Folts) Burdick, and Lenore (Zito) Falvo and her husband Vincent. The main topic of conversation was Betty Lou's recent trip to Germany.
Ned Martin retired from insurance work with Equitable Life in New York City in May '87 and is enjoying every minute of retirement. He says, " My wife, Charlotte, and I moved from New Jersey to Lewes, Delaware. We love the water. I have my own boat and can fish whenever I want. We also enjoy travel and have been abroad to England and Europe. This past April we took a wonderful trip to Portugal, Morocco and Spain." Isabelle (Ellis) McMahon and her husband, Bill, ran a restaurant and campground for 20 years, and are still running the campground in a beautiful area overlooking the Potomac River in western Maryland. She relates, "We are animal lovers and share our home with 11 dogs and 27 cats who live inside. Recently my sister, Mary Kay (Ellis) Earle '49 moved from Arizona to live with us." Fong Chow is retired now from his interesting career as Oriental ceramic expert for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He says, "I have always been an artist at heart, and I loved having a studio, but now I am continuing with painting and photography. I have held several one-man shows in nearby areas." Fong and his wife, Chao-Ling, live in New York City and vacation annually in Maine. Jean (Richmond) Wolcott reports that she and three classmates met for lunch in Syracuse on June 16th: Betty Lou (Ogden) Crowley and her husband Bick, Alice (Folts) Burdick, and Lenore (Zito) Falvo and her husband Vincent. The main topic of conversation was Betty Lou's recent trip to Germany.
Ned Martin retired from insurance work with Equitable Life in New York City in May '87 and is enjoying every minute of retirement. He says, " My wife, Charlotte, and I moved from New Jersey to Lewes, Delaware. We love the water. I have my own boat and can fish whenever I want. We also enjoy travel and have been abroad to England and Europe. This past April we took a wonderful trip to Portugal, Morocco and Spain." Isabelle (Ellis) McMahon and her husband, Bill, ran a restaurant and campground for 20 years, and are still running the campground in a beautiful area overlooking the Potomac River in western Maryland. She relates, "We are animal lovers and share our home with 11 dogs and 27 cats who live inside. Recently my sister, Mary Kay (Ellis) Earle '49 moved from Arizona to live with us." Fong Chow is retired now from his interesting career as Oriental ceramic expert for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He says, "I have always been an artist at heart, and I loved having a studio, but now I am continuing with painting and photography. I have held several one-man shows in nearby areas." Fong and his wife, Chao-Ling, live in New York City and vacation annually in Maine. Jean (Richmond) Wolcott reports that she and three classmates met for lunch in Syracuse on June 16th: Betty Lou (Ogden) Crowley and her husband Bick, Alice (Folts) Burdick, and Lenore (Zito) Falvo and her husband Vincent. The main topic of conversation was Betty Lou's recent trip to Germany.
Ned Martin retired from insurance work with Equitable Life in New York City in May '87 and is enjoying every minute of retirement. He says, " My wife, Charlotte, and I moved from New Jersey to Lewes, Delaware. We love the water. I have my own boat and can fish whenever I want. We also enjoy travel and have been abroad to England and Europe. This past April we took a wonderful trip to Portugal, Morocco and Spain." Isabelle (Ellis) McMahon and her husband, Bill, ran a restaurant and campground for 20 years, and are still running the campground in a beautiful area overlooking the Potomac River in western Maryland. She relates, "We are animal lovers and share our home with 11 dogs and 27 cats who live inside. Recently my sister, Mary Kay (Ellis) Earle '49 moved from Arizona to live with us." Fong Chow is retired now from his interesting career as Oriental ceramic expert for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He says, "I have always been an artist at heart, and I loved having a studio, but now I am continuing with painting and photography. I have held several one-man shows in nearby areas." Fong and his wife, Chao-Ling, live in New York City and vacation annually in Maine. Jean (Richmond) Wolcott reports that she and three classmates met for lunch in Syracuse on June 16th: Betty Lou (Ogden) Crowley and her husband Bick, Alice (Folts) Burdick, and Lenore (Zito) Falvo and her husband Vincent. The main topic of conversation was Betty Lou's recent trip to Germany.
1953
One piece of correspondence, that came from Marilyn Richard Synnestvedt of Alliance, OH. Marilyn thinks retirement is great, as she and Peter have been traveling to England to see the graves of her ancestors, visited Florida for the first time, traveling to see their daughters, and planning on traveling to NY to see classmate Bev Havens. In October, she plans to continue using her Alfred training with private art teaching. The rest of you, please send me your e-mail addresses
One piece of correspondence, that came from Marilyn Richard Synnestvedt of Alliance, OH. Marilyn thinks retirement is great, as she and Peter have been traveling to England to see the graves of her ancestors, visited Florida for the first time, traveling to see their daughters, and planning on traveling to NY to see classmate Bev Havens. In October, she plans to continue using her Alfred training with private art teaching. The rest of you, please send me your e-mail addresses
1955
Dr. Peter P. Ramko reports after Penn Dental School, six years in the Army (four in the Pentagon) and 33 years practicing general dentistry in Boca Raton, FL,"I've retired! With four children through college. Time for a rest."
1968
Brad H. Butterstein is employed as the controller at Data International in Mt. Dora, FL. Data International has two divisions, Graphics and Electronics, which manufactures product identification and sub assemblies for a wide range of industries. Brad has full financial responsibility of both divisions of the company. Data is owned by Robert Welter '68
1973
Our class spirit was there in force at Reunion '98, in enthusiasm if not in numbers. We were a convivial group, enjoyed each other's company, did a lot of reminiscing and catching up, and exploring of renovated landmarks, dear to our hearts. Attendees were Ellis (Chick) Berger and wife Tudy, Isabel Riggs Geibel, Reg Miner, Bob Moebus, Bob Sinclair and wife Patsy, Jim Starkweather, and your correspondent and husband Warren (called "alumnus-in-law" by the late Dr. Sam Scholes, Sr.). Many gatherings were held in the Powell Campus Center, not familiar to me, as it was completed after the last reunion. Thanks to the generosity of classmate Arthur Powell, Alfred has a magnificent and versatile structure, designed for an apparent myriad of activities, from meetings and classrooms to recreational areas and facilities with state-of-the-art amenities and technologies. The Roman Feast Friday night was held in the Knight Club of Powell Center, as was the evening Tent Party. A large white tent had been optimistically erected, complete with inviting white tables, near the old Kanakadea building, but plummeting temperatures precluded any fun outside. So festivities continued inside. Bob Moebus, Jim Starkweather, and Chick Berger compared career similarities, differences, and coincidences. Bob was formerly general sales manager of the Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Clay Division, and Chick was national sales manager for the Stauffer Chemical Corporation. At one time, Chick was a vocational chicken farmer. Their discussion on the possible use of clay pellets in chicken feed was hilarious. (Ask them about it sometime, as it can't be described here.) Chick and wife Tudy have two daughters and a son, Nicholas (Nick) Berger '73. Talking with Jim Starkweather, we learned what a multifaceted person he is. Although he's listed in the Directory as a retired elementary school principal, he had another colorful career in early television in Rochester, NY, where his artistic talents created children's cartoon characters and other innovative programming features, which were pioneer concepts for the time. It was a very rewarding evening. We all attended the Awards Luncheon on Saturday. Reg Miner and Warren had an engaging conversation on their mutual interest in the B-24 Liberator Bomber of WWII days. Isabel Riggs Geibel and I have been close friends since graduation. (It was through her and her late husband that Warren and I met each other but that's another story.) She brought me up-to-date on her busy life. Her latest recognition came at a surprise luncheon in March of this year, when she was honored for her 50 years in the field of social work by her associates at the Bath VA Medical Center. After earning her MS in Social Work in 1948, Isabel worked at the VA Medical Centers in Canandaigua, Bath, and Miami, FL. She retired in 1980, but has continued to volunteer her services at the Bath VA since 1986. It seems that her whole life has been dedicated to helping others, especially veterans and their families. She has said more than once, "When you have an opportunity, go for it." It appeared that most of the class of 1948 also went all-out for their golden anniversary Reunion. At the Luncheon, they occupied an endless number of tables. "Congratulations" are in order, as they had more alumni returning for their 50th reunion than any class in A.U. history. One of the Reunion highlights for us was touring the renovated Steinheim, which now houses the Robert R. McComsey Career Development Center. To see and feel the new life breathed into this venerable landmark was very heartwarming. The designers and contractors succeeded beautifully in maintaining the exterior appearance, and preserving and enhancing the interior ceiling fretwork and unique Gothic windows, while adapting and converting the available space into practical and attractive work areas. It was all very gratifying to me, whose student memories of the Steinheim were of taking snapshots with my Kodak 620 Brownie, and peeking though dusty windows at vintage display cases holding an array of strange artifacts, most of them too unusual to recognize. The Sunday morning Buffet Brunch A.U. Trivia Contest was a challenge. (Most of the early 1940s stuff I knew). Another highlight was a video, converted from movie film, made and narrated by the late Varick Nevins, A.U. math teacher and movie buff, in the 1930's. The film footage included the 1932 Brick fire, an early St. Pat's parade, a MUD water fight, relay races and other sporting events, Prof. Saunders and an associate cutting ice blocks from a frozen pond, and some intrepid Kappa Psi fellows skiing down their hill, using an adroitly placed table as a jump. The narration by punster Nevins evoked some good natured groans from our group. Following the Brunch, Warren and I drove to Olean, my hometown, to visit relatives and friends, then continued on to Buffalo and Rochester for more of the same. Elaine Whitford Fitzgerald was registered for the Reunion but didn't appear. This was of considerable concern to the rest of us as Elaine always attends and had recently written me about her plans to be there. Arriving home, we found a letter from her daughter, who wrote that her mother had recently undergone emergency surgery. I called Elaine and learned she had just that day returned home from the hospital. I'm sure by the time you read these notes, she'll be in fine fettle once again. The problem, while very serious, was not of the kind to recur or give her additional trouble, once her recuperation is complete. I'll be calling her frequently to check on her progress. Knowing Elaine, I feel she'll make a quick, uncomplicated recovery, and be resuming her active lifestyle, but not as soon as she'd prefer. We were truly saddened to learn of the loss of two loyal alumni: Jerry Schwartz on Dec. 21, 1997, and John Ledin on March 13, 1998. Jerry was an active member of the Southern California Section of the American Ceramic Society, and in 1997 was selected as the recipient of the year's Distinguished Life Member Award. He had a Juris Doctor Degree as well, but devoted most of his working life to owning and managing an artware supply company and import business. We'll miss the amusing anecdotes and recollections he used to send that brightened these notes. I know that Bob Sinclair misses a friendship of long standing. Our sincere belated sympathy to Jerry's wife and family. John Ledin was an active contributor to this column, and leaves an emptiness that can't be filled in my feelings and in these notes. His was a pleasant and familiar presence at our class reunions, and he'll be sorely missed. My thanks to Bob Sinclair for calling and sending me information on Jerry, and to Ed Gere '48 for phoning me about John's demise. While back East, we had the pleasure of visiting and dining with some dear longtime friends, Margaret Cudworth Donohue '37, daughter Jean and her husband Don. Our acquaintance dated way back to the early 1950s, when we all lived in the Buffalo area and had partial reign of the very large and diverse Alfred alumni group there. It was a challenging job but we loved it. In closing this column, I hope I have given you some of the color and feel of Reunion '98 with my limited perspective from an old graduate's viewpoint. Jeanette Dunham is living in Marathon, FL and wrote, "We're living in 'paradise'- lots of water activities, swimming, fishing etc., theatres, bridge, good library, hospital and airport - No hurricanes, please." Dr. Guy Hartman, Salt Lake City, Utah wrote, "I spent last September visiting the historic organs (pipe) in Basel, Colmar, Kaysersberg, Munich, Hamburg, Leuebeck, Budapest, Prague, Dresden, Berlin and Frankfurt, then went to Poland for the month of October to teach English in a rural school near the Berlaruss border. Interesting experience but I don't want to be a teacher when I grow up. Thirty years of teaching medical students at USC didn't prepare me for teaching Junior High." Jane Bickford wrote, "I am still a practicing artist specializing mostly in watercolor and occasional sign painting, calligraphy. I belong to the North Shore Art Association of Gloucester, MA. My children sponsored me for 2 painting trips recently. It was the treat of my life, and helped my painting immensely. I am forever grateful to them for that."
1989
Brandi Brooks '91 reports there is a growing colony of transplanted Saxons in San Diego. Among the pioneers: Chris Beck '89, Mike Augustin '90, Nicki Bruce '89, Tim Herlehy '90, Russ Hall '90, and Amy Trieste Hall '92. A recent visit from Tom Lenihan '89 and wife, Kim Antonsson Lehihan '89, was the occasion for a gathering of expatriate Alfredians.
Brandi Brooks '91 reports there is a growing colony of transplanted Saxons in San Diego. Among the pioneers: Chris Beck '89, Mike Augustin '90, Nicki Bruce '89, Tim Herlehy '90, Russ Hall '90, and Amy Trieste Hall '92. A recent visit from Tom Lenihan '89 and wife, Kim Antonsson Lehihan '89, was the occasion for a gathering of expatriate Alfredians.
Brandi Brooks '91 reports there is a growing colony of transplanted Saxons in San Diego. Among the pioneers: Chris Beck '89, Mike Augustin '90, Nicki Bruce '89, Tim Herlehy '90, Russ Hall '90, and Amy Trieste Hall '92. A recent visit from Tom Lenihan '89 and wife, Kim Antonsson Lehihan '89, was the occasion for a gathering of expatriate Alfredians.
Brandi Brooks '91 reports there is a growing colony of transplanted Saxons in San Diego. Among the pioneers: Chris Beck '89, Mike Augustin '90, Nicki Bruce '89, Tim Herlehy '90, Russ Hall '90, and Amy Trieste Hall '92. A recent visit from Tom Lenihan '89 and wife, Kim Antonsson Lehihan '89, was the occasion for a gathering of expatriate Alfredians.
1990
Brandi Brooks '91 reports there is a growing colony of transplanted Saxons in San Diego. Among the pioneers: Chris Beck '89, Mike Augustin '90, Nicki Bruce '89, Tim Herlehy '90, Russ Hall '90, and Amy Trieste Hall '92. A recent visit from Tom Lenihan '89 and wife, Kim Antonsson Lehihan '89, was the occasion for a gathering of expatriate Alfredians.
Brandi Brooks '91 reports there is a growing colony of transplanted Saxons in San Diego. Among the pioneers: Chris Beck '89, Mike Augustin '90, Nicki Bruce '89, Tim Herlehy '90, Russ Hall '90, and Amy Trieste Hall '92. A recent visit from Tom Lenihan '89 and wife, Kim Antonsson Lehihan '89, was the occasion for a gathering of expatriate Alfredians.
Brandi Brooks '91 reports there is a growing colony of transplanted Saxons in San Diego. Among the pioneers: Chris Beck '89, Mike Augustin '90, Nicki Bruce '89, Tim Herlehy '90, Russ Hall '90, and Amy Trieste Hall '92. A recent visit from Tom Lenihan '89 and wife, Kim Antonsson Lehihan '89, was the occasion for a gathering of expatriate Alfredians.
Lauren D. Butler has recently been appointed to the Alfred Twenty-First Century Group's Executive Advisory Council. She is currently employed as an bookkeeper and data entry specialist at Corrie Craft, a business owned by John Lang, a local artisan. Prior to serving in this role, she worked for the Hornell field office of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), as the assistant manager of the College Bookstore in Alfred, as a teller for Steuben Trust and as a service supervisor for Liken Temporary Services in Cheektowaga, NY. She also operates a small specialized sewing business.
Gordon Andrus had a pottery show in Louisville, KY, which was well received. He has two sons, Loyal, age 5, and Jim, age 2 1/2.
1991
Clive Howard was inducted into Corning-Painted Post Sports Hall of Fame. Clive was Sullivan Trail Conference's MVP in his senior year on the Corning District soccer team. He went on to play at AU and now coaches youth soccer.
An article interviewing Milissa Hicks, ran in the February 1998 issue of SchoolArts.
Brandi Brooks '91 reports there is a growing colony of transplanted Saxons in San Diego. Among the pioneers: Chris Beck '89, Mike Augustin '90, Nicki Bruce '89, Tim Herlehy '90, Russ Hall '90, and Amy Trieste Hall '92. A recent visit from Tom Lenihan '89 and wife, Kim Antonsson Lehihan '89, was the occasion for a gathering of expatriate Alfredians.
Thomas Gillett coached his first year of boys varsity soccer at W. Irondequoit High. They finished 8-11-0, advanced to sectional quarters before losing to #2 Penfield High School.
1992
Paul DiCesare recently passed through Alfred on his way back to Johnson City, NY, for his 10-year high school reunion. He was recently promoted to senior production engineer with P.P.G. Industries, Inc., in Meadville PA, and is rapidly rising through the ranks.
1993
Michelle Plucinsky, a Dearborn resident and the co-owner of Furnace Hot Glass Works, had her pieces on display at B.C. Beans Art Gallery in Wyandotte, MI. The new exhibit that focused on "Glass in the Fine Arts" is part of Michigan Glass Month which has been observed for the past 17 years during April. Michelle's glass education started in 1990 at The Haystack School of Mountain Crafts in Maine. She also studied at The Center for Creative Studies, The Pilchuck Glass School in Washington, Alfred University and The Penland School of Crafts. She returned to The Haystack School of Mountain Grafts and the Center for Creative Studies as an instructor. She taught at the Corning Museum of Glass, Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in MI.
Kristine Elder has a new position as RN at Spartenburg Regional in Spartanburg, NC.
Brian C. La Course has a new position as R&D Project Manager for Saint Gobian Norton Industrial Ceramic Corporation in Northboro, MA.
1994
Madeline Austin '94 just returned from a 10 day vacation in Paris. She is living just outside Newark, DE (in Bear), with no plans of relocating in the near future. Madeline has just completed her second year as a manufacturing engineer at Ametek Process Instruments in Newark, DE.
1995
Elizabeth Hall and Karl Ginter celebrated their marriage with their friends and family, before leaving the country for two years. Karl will be stationed in southern Germany in the US Army. Liz is looking forward to meeting Karl's extended family overseas. Best of luck to the newlyweds.
Megan Sherburne is a marketing assistant/graphic artist at Rowley-Schlimger in Madison, WI.
Ellen Sawtell has been working at Professional Examination Service in New York City for almost 3 years now. As a senior research assistant in the department of Research and Development, Ellen is currently doing a job analysis for the AICPA (accountants) and AACN (critical care nurses). She also works on practical examinations for professional credential programs.
Darren Miller is enjoying working as a photography researcher for a company called The Stock Market in New York City.
Samuel Conzone is the recipient of The Most Outstanding Graduate Student Award for the second consecutive year at the University of Missouri-Rolla. Samuel is currently a doctorate candidate working in the field of Bioceramics. His work is focused on designing radioactive glass microspheres for the treatment of liver cancer and rheumatoid arthritis and the development of bioactive materials which stimulate bone growth in the body.
Wendy Corrice has completed a Microsoft certified assistant engineer certification program.
Brent McLean is working back in the state of New York as a process engineer at Corning, Inc., in Canton.
1996
Carlyle Hicks '96 will be beginning his second year as a residence hall director at SUNY Farmingdale this August. He is hoping to start working on a masters in education from the Higher Education Administration Program at CUNY Baruch.
Christie Poffenbaugh '96 is working as a mechanical engineer for an engineering consulting firm headquartered in Syracuse, New York.
Alex Chediak '96 is a photolithography technology development engineer at IBM in Burlington, VT.
Congratulations to George '96 and Kristine (Deily) Dale who were married on April 25, 1998 in Scranton, PA. They write, "We are both working as process engineers for Corning, Incorporated in Danville, VA and live in Dry Fork, VA-yes it is as country as it sounds! Things are going well for us. We are both enjoying being married and love our jobs. Virginia is a long way from both of our families but it is beautiful down here."
Brad H. Butterstein is employed as the controller at Data International in Mt. Dora, FL. Data International has two divisions, Graphics and Electronics, which manufactures product identification and sub assemblies for a wide range of industries. Brad has full financial responsibility of both divisions of the company. Data is owned by Robert Welter '68
Faith Laubenheimer '96 and Samantha Brooks '97 have both recently been accepted to the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Faith will be pursuing a masters in a special international business program while Sam will be beginning a masters in a psychology and social working program. Both were excited to hear a fellow Alfredian will be on campus.
Kimberly Kramer is the new life science, biology and chemistry teacher at Arkport School, Arkport, NY. She taught alternate math, science and health at the Hornell Wildwood Campus for seven years before joining the Arkport faculty.
Andrew Jacobs is working at MTV.
Lisa Schoff is a school psychologist in Lee County Schools in Sanford, NC. Her husband Jeff Occhipinti is a special education teacher in Durham, NC. They reside in Apex, NC.
1997
Jennifer Gerda has been appointed staff accountant for Grill & Partners, Fairfield CT. Jennifer joined the firm after graduation and is responsible for preparing tax returns, audit compilations and financial statements. Grill & Partners is a certified public accounting and business advisory firm founded in 1984 that provides a broad range of services, with special emphasis on financial and tax planning.
Faith Laubenheimer '96 and Samantha Brooks '97 have both recently been accepted to the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Faith will be pursuing a masters in a special international business program while Sam will be beginning a masters in a psychology and social working program. Both were excited to hear a fellow Alfredian will be on campus.
Deborah (Schaffer '97) Farren and husband, Drew, are currently living in Clarksville, TN.
JoAnne Charlay '97 finished her masters in Community Service Administration this spring. Congratulations JoAnne!
Stacey Sabo '97 is working for a ceramics firm in Buffalo, NY.
1998
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.
Congratulations on the format of our new Spring issue. I hope that many of you looked over the articles preceding our class notes. The first article, "Academic Alley", was informative. There was the scholastic evaluation of Alfred as noted in U.S. News and World Report. There was an interesting article about the best-selling author Thomas Cahill, who was the speaker for our 102nd Commencement. Mention was made that his son, Joseph, was a member of the graduating class. The cover story, "The Honor System", reminded me of a speech that was given many years ago to the incoming Alfred freshmen, by a past president of Rider College, Dr. Frank Elliot '71. He was a former student of mine at Silver Creek High and was a firm believer in all around education. Speaking of presidents, I was sorry to hear that Alfred will be losing President Edward G. Coll, Jr., after the summer of 2000. The college is grateful for the many years he has served. During the time I was at Alfred, I recall that we had three presidents from 1932 to 1937: Boothe Colwell Davis, 1895-1933, Emerson Titsworth, 1933, and John Nelson Norwood, 1933-1945. In March your correspondent attended the Sarasota Club gathering hosted by Col. Dante Vezzoli '33 and his wife Grace. At the beginning of the luncheon, Dante made the announcement of the passing of Otis Rockefeller '27. He usually gave the benediction and was very loyal. Coincidentally he happened to meet Ted Knapp at the retirement complex in Orange City. They became close friends. Ted recently attended the 85th birthday celebration of his brother James '35. It was held at a lake in Augusta, ME. After his arrival at Melbourne the rest of the trip home had many detours for Ted, due to the Florida fires. Actually his home is only 20 miles from the area. Another of Mother Nature's calamities was the flood in New York. John and Marie Barvian of Toledo, Ohio, can attest to it. For our 61st Reunion, only 3 brave ones attended. Present were Sam Scholes, who recently passed his short-wave test, Marion Bartlett from the Poconos and Dot Schirm Ievers who has resided in Ireland all her married life. Dot made her first Reunion on our 50th and has returned almost every year since. Coincidentally, last August when I was in London, we missed seeing each other. She happened to be in London at a family wedding. Don Hallenbeck continues his marketing and communications business which was started in 1938 by him and his brother-in-law Chuck Riley '35. While at Alfred Don worked his way through by catering meals for other students. After college, he ran an ice cream parlor and a swimming pool. (Many of you had side jobs. Drop me a line.) Ed Kunzman gave me a nice call from Tyler, TX. I've only seen him twice since graduation. Many years ago we were both at the Chicago Ceramic Convention, and then, at our 50th. I've known his 2 older sons for years. Ben and Helen Racusin have jaunted from Hilton Head to Colorado and Kansas for family get-togethers. Their next reunion is to be in Hartford, CT. Marie Marion Flessel '36 and Creig plan to move to California within 2 years, as most of their family resides there. They live in Huntington, LI. Creig is an artist, as are many of their family and he will continue it in California. Marie and I are graduates of an outstanding girls' high school in Brooklyn. It was named Girls' High, and all those attending were to go on to college, a rarity those days. It is through Marie that I chose Alfred. I haven't seen her for a number of years, but she has promised to come into New York to meet me the next time I'm there. Incidentally, she was invited to reside at the Drake home, after the Brick fire. At that time President Drake taught history. The picture on page 27 was very significant to her. Our mutual friend, Betty Krathwohl '36 of Ipswich, MA, has had a stroke. We keep in touch with her very nice family who live nearby. Betty, incidentally, is from Silver Creek and her father got me my first teaching job there, which came 3 years after my graduation. Silver Creek, by the way, is in New York. As to your correspondent's activities, I am preparing for a 6-day jaunt in Ohio, to attend the wedding of a former student I tutored there. While in the area, I'll be seeing many of my Toledo friends. Classmates, surprise me with a card before our next magazine comes out.