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Alfred University researchers receive National Science Foundation funds for analytical equipment
8/24/17

Professors in the Inamori School of Engineering at Alfred University have secured a $370,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to purchase and install a new piece of analytical equipment for teaching and research.

            Dr. Scott Misture and Dr. S.K. Sundaram, who are both Inamori Professors of Materials Science and Engineering, explain the new equipment “is a critical tool for uncovering the structural origins of material properties and processing dynamics, especially when performed under conditions of controlled temperature or gaseous environment (in-situ) or under controlled operating conditions (operando).”

            The Raman system being acquired will include two temperature-controlled chambers, which will allow the equipment to be operated from minus-196 to 1550 degrees Celsius, with both single-point and three-dimensional mapping, to advance studies of electroceramics and electrochemical devices, structural and optical ceramics, glasses and biomaterials.

            The new system will integrate with existing in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) facilities and will augment both the High-Temperature Materials Testing Laboratory and the new Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory at Alfred University.

            Through direct examination of materials in-situ or under controlled operating conditions, research teams will aim to uncover new atomic-scale processes that can be used to make transformational progress in materials discovery and design, according to Misture and Sundaram.

            The new Raman system will be used for both teaching and research, they say. It will be used during a required undergraduate lab course, two elective courses and to support senior thesis projects. Hands-on use by graduate students, post-doctoral researchers, faculty and industrial scientists for both research and analytical work will enhance current and future materials studies.