Alfred University News

Alfred University alumnus’ Brooklyn exhibition featured in Glass Quarterly

A Brooklyn gallery’s exhibition of artwork created by Alfred University alumnus Andrew Erdos ’07 was featured recently in Glass Quarterly.


BROOKLYN, NY —  A Brooklyn gallery’s exhibition of artwork created by Alfred University alumnus Andrew Erdos ’07 was featured recently in Glass Quarterly.

Erdos’ exhibition, titled “Not for the peak, but for the mountain,” opened May 21 at the The Chimney gallery, and remains on view through Saturday, July 26. The exhibition was reviewed in the July 14 issue of Glass Quarterly, an art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass in Brooklyn, NY.

Erdos, a Brooklyn-based artist whose practice often combines traditional glass blowing and sculpting techniques with new media art installations, earned a B.F.A. degree from Alfred University in 2007.

“Not for the peak, but for the mountain” is a 12-foot high by 12-foot wide commissioned glass sculpture. A press release from The Chimney describes the work as “a monument to earth’s geological history and to the necessary coexistence of nature and industry.”

Built on a reclaimed industrial wood palette, the sculpture is made of five separate sections that each consists of a steel armature wrapped in galvanized steel mesh. Two metal tanks, concealed within the piece, are filled with water. The exterior is covered with hundreds of layers of molten glass.

 “In the glass-making process, the difference between a piece cracking or melting can be a few seconds,” Erdos explains. “When glass is in its molten state, it acts similarly to a living organism. It produces heat, moves and radiates light. As it cools down, it cracks and dies. The glass can then melt again and re-incarnate into its next form.”

Erdos’ work has been shown internationally at venues such as The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg Russia; Deitch Projects (Art Parade) New York, NY; Jilin University Changchun China; and The National Center for Contemporary Art, Moscow. His work is in the permanent collections of the Corning Museum of Glass; the Knoxville (TN) Museum of Art; and the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art Kansas City, MO.