Alfred University News

Alfred Ceramic Art Museum to open September 24

Diedrick Brackens is one of four artists whose work will be featured at the Alfred Ceramic Museum.
Diedrick Brackens is one of four artists whose work will be featured at the Alfred Ceramic Museum.

The Alfred Ceramic Museum opens Sept. 24 with a new, virtual reality exhibition as well as two other on-site exhibitions.  Full Capacity features Diedrick Brackens and three additional artists, Lisa Marie Barber, Coco Klockner and Jeanne Quinn. 


ALFRED, NY – The Alfred Ceramic Museum opens Sept. 24 with a new, virtual reality exhibition as well as two other on-site exhibitions.

 Full Capacity features Diedrick Brackens and three additional artists, Lisa Marie Barber, Coco Klockner and Jeanne Quinn. They were invited by museum guest curator Kelcy Chase Folsom to collaborate with Primal Screen, an award winning multi-platform, design agency specializing in animation, in the creation of four individual full 360-degree virtual installations. Developed from drawings based on each artist’s studio practice, in response to a painting by Ryan Mrozowski, Primal Screen designers built unique virtual spaces.

The resulting exhibition is not a video posting of in-reality art works, a gallery tour or a performance. These art works are totally original and can only be experienced in virtual space. “This is the first excursion for the museum into the vast potential of the virtual reality art world,” says Wayne Higby, Director and Chief Curator of the Museum. “Even if you can’t get to the Museum you can experience this unique exhibition.”

The installations will be accessible on the Museum’s website, ceramicsmuseum.edu, beginning Sept. 24. They will be available for viewing on a computer, IPhone or tablet.

Diedrick Brackens’s work resonates with a world stricken by the COVID-19 virus, Higby observes, quoting from scholar-curator Glenn Adamson, who works at the intersection of art, craft and design. In an article published in Art in America, May 15, 2020, Adamson writes: “Even before the arrival of COVID-19, Brackens’s work seemed almost unbearably relevant to what was going on in the world. Now, viewed through the overhanging veil of plague times—at a moment when all-purpose heroism is so much in demand—it has become essential.”

Adamson further observes Brackens’s new weavings “offer an exploration of queer black experience that is at once heartbreaking and uplifting.” They evoke the observation of Chiron, the central character of Barry Jenkins’s 2016 film, Moonlight: “I cry so much sometimes; I feel like I’ma turn to drops.”

Brackens was born in 1989 in Mexia, Texas, and currently lives in Los Angeles. He is best known for his woven tapestries that explore allegory and narrative through his own autobiography, broader themes of African American and queer identity, as well as American history. Brackens employs techniques from West African weaving, quilting from the American South and European tapestry-making to create both abstract and figurative works.

He earned his MFA at California College of the Arts in San Francisco, and his work has appeared at the Hammer Museum, in Los Angeles, and the Studio Museum and the New Museum, both in New York City.

Other exhibitions opening in the main gallery of the Alfred Ceramic Museum include: The Jazz Age Sculpture of Waylande Gregory, Inventory: The Ceramic Art of Nick Lenker, and Double Take, an exhibition of pieces from the permanent collection of the Museum that features the work of the 2020 MFA Ceramic Art Graduates from the School of Art and Design at Alfred University.

 

Covid 19 protocols are being observed. Please visit the Museum’s website for further information. All AU students, faculty and staff are welcome. Hours Wednesday-Saturday, 10am -5pm. Other visitors by appointment call 607.871.2421