School Psychology Doctorate

The Psy.D. program in School Psychology at Alfred University follows a practitioner-scientist model. It is designed to prepare psychologists to practice advanced skills in schools and other child and family settings, and to prepare graduates for positions in applied research, administration and supervision, mental health agencies, hospitals, higher education, and private practice.

Our APA-accredited doctoral program involves three years of full-time coursework and practica; a year-long, full-time doctoral internship; and the completion of a doctoral dissertation. After two years in the program, our students receive their Master of Arts degree. Thus, they complete our NASP-approved specialist program on their way toward completing the doctoral program.

To learn more about APA accreditation contact

Alfred University's program leads to eligibility for licensure as a psychologist, as well as certification as a school psychologist at the state and national level.
 
For the doctoral program, we accept applicants with their bachelor's degree, master's in other areas of psychology, and advanced-standing students who have a master's degree in School Psychology. Applicants who have a master's degree in School Psychology from programs other than Alfred University should contact Dr. Jana Atlas to discuss admission to the program.
 
All requirements for the Psy.D. degree must be completed within seven years of matriculation into the program.

Doctoral Handbook

Psy.D. : Typical Course Sequence

FIRST YEAR

First Semester
PSYC 601 Foundations of Cultural Diversity (1)
PSYC 603 Foundations of School Psychology (3)
PSYC 607 Learning and Cognition (3)
PSYC 626 Psychological and Educational Measurements (2)
PSYC 627 Norm-Referenced Testing I (2)
PSYC 636 Foundations of Interpersonal Effectiveness (3)
PSYC 637 Introduction to Group Dynamics (1)
PSYC 656 Field Experience in School Psychology (1)
Total Credits 16

Second Semester
PSYC 606 Advanced Developmental Psychology (3)
PSYC 629 Social-Emotional Assessment (3)
PSYC 632 Norm-Referenced Testing II  (2)
PSYC 638 Psychotherapy and Behavior Change (3)
PSYC 639 Exceptionality in Learning and Behavior (3)
PSYC 657 Field Experience in School Psychology II (1)
Total Credits 15

SECOND YEAR

Third Semester
PSYC 628 Academic Functioning (3)
PSYC 641 Introduction to Family Therapy (3)
PSYC 646 Consultation and Prevention (3)
PSYC 658 Clinic Practicum I (3)
PSYC 671 Statistical Analysis and Research Design I (3)
Elective (3)
Total Credits 18

Fourth Semester
PSYC 609 Physical Bases of Behavior (3)
PSYC 642 Clinical Seminar: Advanced Topics in School Psychology (3)
PSYC 651 Academic Interventions (2)
PSYC 659 Clinic Practicum II (3)
PSYC 664 Practicum in Academic Interventions (1)
PSYC 672 Statistical Analysis and Research Design II (3)
PSYC 695 Professional Practice Seminar (3)
Total Credits 18

THIRD YEAR

Fifth Semester
PSYC 673 Statistical Analysis and Research Design (3)
PSYC 674 Research in School Psychology (3)
PSYC 692 Supervision/Administration off Psychological Services (3)
PSYC 699 Dissertation (6)
Elective (3)
Total Credits: 18

Sixth Semester
PSYC 602 Seminar in Cultural Diversity (2)
PSYC 608 Social Psychology and Behavior (3)
PSYC 611 History and Systems of Psychology (3)
PSYC 699 Dissertation (6)
Elective (3)
Total Credits:  17

FOURTH YEAR

Seventh Semester
PSYC 669 Pre-Doctoral Internship in School Psychology I (9)

Eighth Semester

PSYC 670 Pre-Doctoral Internship in School Psychology II (9)

FIFTH YEAR (if applicable)

Beginning in Year 5, all students must enroll each semester for a minimum of 3 credits until the completion of all program requirements.

Minimum Total Credit Hours Required for the Program:  120

Psy.D. Practicum and Internship

Reflecting the rapid growth in the knowledge base in professional psychology, as well as the accreditation guidelines of American Psychological Association (APA), the program at AU blends a substantial foundation in the basic science of psychology with its longstanding tradition of extensive field experience and practical skills development.

In the Schools
Beginning in the first semester of the program, students participate in extensive fieldwork in Alfred-area school systems. Students are placed in a local public school one day per week during the first semester and one and a half days per week during the second semester, where they gain graduated experience working with both regular education children as well as those with special needs. Such practical experience assists the students in developing an understanding of the complexities of the school environment and allows them to begin to acquire valuable skills in communication, consultation, assessment, and intervention. These practica lay a foundation of knowledge and experience that better prepares the student for the challenges s/he will encounter as a professional school psychologist. School psychology faculty members closely coordinate with on-site supervisors to facilitate this fieldwork. On-site supervisors formally evaluate the student each semester on the competencies specified by program faculty.

In the Child and Family Services Center
During the second year, students have experience in the Child and Family Services Center, a recently renovated spacious on-campus facility with a state-of-the-art communication/observation system. Not only does this practicum expose students to the environment of a community clinic, but gives them direct experience in intake assessment, psycho-educational assessment, consultation, and intervention with children and their families.

Licensed psychologists from the school psychology faculty directly supervise this work through closed-circuit television, two-way mirror observation, audio and video taping, and individual and group case conferencing.

In the Community
Advanced doctoral students continue to develop their applied skills through individually designed practicum placements during their third year of coursework. These practicum placements may take place in counseling and mental health agencies, in schools or agencies serving specific client populations, or in public school settings.  Doctoral students participate in professional roles under the close supervision of field and university supervisors.

During the Internship
All students must complete at least one year of full time internship. This experience is the culmination of the student's classroom and previous fieldwork and allows the student to perform the duties of a professional psychologist under the supervision of an on-site doctoral level licensed psychologist. Faculty members coordinate with internship sites to insure quality control and consistency with the goals and objectives of the program. Interns are compensated with a stipend from the internship site during this year of fieldwork.

The program at Alfred University is strongly committed to training practitioner-scientists. Thus, we expect our students to be both knowledgeable consumers and active practitioners of research.

Research apprenticeship - During the first year of the program, each student works as an apprentice to a faculty member. Students may develop their own study or work on a study developed by a faculty member or more advanced doctoral student. Through this orientation, our students gain experience in planning and conducting research, analyzing data, and writing studies.

Statistics and research sequence - Across the second and third years of the program, doctoral students take three courses in Statistical Analysis and Research Design. Thus, they understand a broad range of research methodologies, as well as basic and advanced statistical techniques.

Dissertation - The dissertation is the culminating student research experience. Through this experience, students conduct an independent research project on a topic they select related to the practice of psychology with children and families. This project is supervised by a sponsoring committee of faculty members.

Students and faculty members regularly work on additional research projects with one another. Here are some examples of recent presentations:

1. Taking Another Look at Teacher Attitudes Throughout Various RtI Stages
2. A Model for the Pre-Service Training of School Psychologists to Facilitate the
Implementation of RtI
3. Facilitating RtI Implementation in Schools: A Client-Centered Consultation Process
4. Using Consultation to Increase Early Numeracy Skills: Demonstrating Client-Centered
Instructional Consultation in an Educational Case Study
5. Using a Geographic Information System to Improve Understanding of Rural Education in
New York State
6. The Peer Interspersal Procedure: An Intervention to Improve Vocabulary Knowledge
7. Parent Perceptions of Rural School Psychologists
8. The Role of Null Results in School Psychology Research and Publications
9. Increasing Pro-Social Behavior Through Violence Prevention Programming
10. Addressing Grief Reactions in Parents of Children with Disabilities
11. Evolving Attitudes of Teachers Throughout Varying Stages of RtI Implementation
12. Spoken Language/Literacy Outcomes: Children with and without Hearing Loss
13. Lexical Language: Preschool Children with Cochlear Implants vs. Typical Hearing
14. Prevention Science: A Proposed Model of Cyberbullying
15. Evaluating School Climate
16. A Preliminary Study: Experiences of Families with Children with Autism in Western New
York: Diagnosis and Intervention Services
17. Examining the Differences in Expressive and Receptive Lexical Language Skills in Preschool
Children with Cochlear Implants and Children with Typical Hearing
18. Teacher and Administrator Perceptions of Zero Tolerance vs. BPIS
19. An Investigation in Friendship
20. Reducing Juvenile Delinquency Through the Development and Implementation of a Ruralbased
Youth Court Mentoring Program
21. The Use of Qualitative Data Collection to Investigate Validity of Measures of Perceived
Organizational Health and Teacher Efficacy
22. Teaching Teenagers about Teen Dating Voilence and Healthy Relationships
23. Evaluating School Psychology Students’ Perceptions of Preparedness for Internships
24. Reality TV Programs, Internet Use, and Eating Disorder Symptoms in Adolescents
25. Training Models and Applied Experiences in School Psych: The Match Between Model and
Practice

The PsyD Program in School Psychology at Alfred can be completed in a minimum of four years, inclusive of the internship and dissertation for students beginning with a Bachelor’s Degree. Most students take longer, as many elect to take additional practicum or internship options which extend the timeline while greatly enriching the experience gained by students. The following table presents data from all program graduates within the past seven years, illustrating program completion rates.

Outcome Year in which Degrees were Conferred
2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016- 2017 Total
Total number of students with doctoral degree conferred on transcript 7 4 6 3 3 7 3 37
Mean number of years to complete the program 5.8 7.9 7.9 6.4 5.3

7.4

7.2 6.8
Median number of years to complete the program 5.0 6.0 6.5 7.5 5.0 7.5 7.0 6.4
Time to Degree Ranges N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N %
Students in less than 5 years

2

28.5

0

0

0

0

2

28.6

1

33.3

1 14 0
0

6

16.2

Students in 5 years

2

29

2

50

0

0

0

0.0

1

33.3

1 14 1
33.3

7

18.9

Students in 6 years

1

14

0

0

3

50

1

14.3

0

0.0

0 0 0
0

5

13.5

Students in 7 years

1

14

1

25

1

20

0

0.0

0

0.0

2 29 0
0

5

13.5

Students in more than 7 years

1

14

1

25

2

33

4

57.1

1

33.3

3 43 2
66.7

14

37.8

Students entering the program with previous graduate-level coursework may be able to gain transfer credit. Such credits must be in courses in which the student earned a grade of B or better, and which duplicate coursework in Alfred University's School Psychology Program in breadth and depth. Students must complete at least half of their required coursework at Alfred University and attend for at least two years. Students entering the program with a previous Master's degree in School Psychology are usually able to complete their coursework in two years; those with Master's degrees in other areas of Psychology, Counseling, or Education typically take three years to complete their coursework. After completion of coursework, these students must complete a yearlong internship and an empirical dissertation study.

Program Costs

PsyD students at Alfred typically matriculate as full-time students, and are thus eligible for additional financial aid. The estimated costs of attendance for 2016-2017 are listed below.

Description
2016-2017 1st-year Cohort Cost
Tuition for full-time students (in-state)
$38,020*
Tuition for full-time students (out-of-state)
$38,020*
Tuition per credit hour for part-time students (if applicable enter amount; if not applicable enter "NA")
$810
University/institution fees or costs
$990
Additional estimated fees or costs to students (e.g., books, travel)
$1,800

* Note: Each accepted full-time student is granted an assistantship covering 50% of tuition ($19,010)

Alfred is committed to providing access to our doctoral program through a variety of financial supports. All full-time students are eligible for a graduate assistantship, and many students receive additional funding through competitive opportunities for fellowships and grants. The following supports are available:

  • Doctoral Fellowships providing additional funding for the first year are awarded to three or four incoming students based on evaluation of application credentials.
  • Grants and contracts obtained by the Lea R. Powell Institute for Children and Families are often available to provide additional stipends, as well as offering rich clinical or research experiences.
  • A small number of full-tuition assistantships are awarded beginning in the second year.
  • Based on these resources, 100% of students beginning the program in the 2014-2015 academic year received additional funding to cover 63% or more of tuition costs.
  • Of the 16 doctoral students on campus during the 2014-2015 academic year, 69% are receiving funding support at 63% or higher for tuition costs.

Internship Placement - Table 1

Students in the PsyD program at Alfred enjoy a 100% success rate in securing internships. Most students are seeking positions in school sites which offer the range of experiences consistent with their career goals for practice in school settings. Others seek quality internships combining school and hospital or agency experiences. Those students whose career goals involve advanced training for research or academic careers seek internships that are APA-accredited or offered by APPIC members. All internships are high quality and meet the guidelines established by the Council of Directors of School Psychology Programs (CDSPP). Nearly every student secures a funded internship.

Outcome
Year Applied for Internship
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014
2014-2015
2015-2016 2016.2017
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
Students who obtained APA/CPA-accredited internships

1

14

0

0

0

0

1

10

1

10

0

100

1
25
Students who obtained APPIC member internships that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable)

0

0

0

0

1

11

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Students who obtained other membership organization internships (e.g. CAPIC) that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Students who obtained internships conforming to CDSPP guidelines that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable)

6

86

4

100

8

89

9

90

9

90

4

100

3
75
Students who obtained other internships that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Students who obtained any internship

7

100

4

100

9

100

10

100

10

100

4

100

4

100

Students who sought or applied for internships including those who withdrew from the application process

7

-

4

-

9

-

10

-

10

-

4

-

4

-

Internship Placement - Table 2

Outcome
Year Applied for Internship
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014
2014-2015
2015-2016
2016-2017
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
Students who sought or applied for internships including those who withdrew from the application process

7

-

4

-

9

-

10

-

10

-

5

-

4

-

Students who obtained paid internships

4

57

2

50

9

100

10

100

10

100

5

100

4
100
Students who obtained half-time internships* (if applicable)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
20
0
0

Attrition

Doctoral students at Alfred have a strong completion rate for the doctoral program. The mentoring and peer support help students to remain engaged and productive during coursework, internship, and dissertation phrases of the program.

Variable
Year of First Enrollment
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014
2014-2015
2015-2016
2016-2017
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
Students for whom this is the year of first enrollment (i.e. new students)

7

-

8

-

9

-

8

-

6

-

6

-

5

-

Students whose doctoral degrees were conferred on their transcripts

3

42.9

3

37.5

1

11.1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Students still enrolled in program
3
42.9
4
50.0
7
77.8
7
87.5
4
66.7
6
100
5
100
Students no longer enrolled for any reason other than conferral of doctoral degree

1

14.3

1

12.5

1

1.1

1

12.5

2

33.3

0

0

0

0

Licensure

The PsyD Program in School Psychology at Alfred is approved by the State of New York as offering licensure-qualifying training which meets all educational requirements for the License in Psychology. Some of our students seek licensure, which allows them to practice independently, and to bill Medicaid for services offered in schools. Graduates who practice in schools do not need a license, but become certified as school psychologists according to state education regulations.

Outcomes
2007 to 2017
The total number of program graduates (doctoral degrees conferred on transcript) between 2 and 10 years ago
44
The number of these graduates (between 2 and 10 years ago) who became licensed psychologists in the past 10 years
25
Licensure percentage
57%

The mission of the Psy.D. program at Alfred University is the preparation of psychologists for applied professional practice in schools and other child and family oriented settings.

In pursuing its mission, the program pursues goals for its students in the areas of personal, professional, and research competencies.

Training is organized around the following three broad goals:

  • To produce professional psychologists with the personal qualities, interpersonal skills and awareness, and the ethical sensitivity predictive of success in a broad array of social, economic, and political contexts.
  • To produce psychologists competent to access a broad range of theoretical and practical approaches with sufficient depth to be effective, flexible practitioners.
  • To produce professional psychologists competent in the conduct, comprehension, and application of research to professional practice.